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Brooklyn, NY (Greenpoint)
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Brooklyn, NY 11222
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Englewood, NJ
370 Grand Avenue
Englewood, NJ 07631
201.816.8778

WESTMED Medical Group
73 Market Street,
GPS enter 1 Ridge Hill Blvd.
Yonkers, NY  10710

914.848.8060

 

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The best shoe for women's feet is a walking shoe with laces (not a slip-on), a composition sole, and a relatively wider heel with a rigid and padded heel counter, no more than three-quarters of an inch in height.

Some women inflict punishment on their feet from improper footwear that can bring about unnecessary foot problems. Some of the problems result from high-heeled shoes (generally defined as pumps with heels of more than two inches).

A study conducted by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society found that:

  • Nine out of 10 women wear shoes that are too small for their feet.
  • Eight out of 10 women say their shoes are painful.
  • More than 7 out of 10 women have developed a bunion, hammertoe, or other painful foot deformity.
  • Women are nine times more likely to develop a foot problem because of improper fitting shoes than a man.
  • Nine out of 10 women's foot deformities can be attributed to tight shoes.

High-heeled, pointed-toe shoes can cause numerous orthopedic problems, leading to discomfort or injury to the toes, ankles, knees, calves, and back. Many high-heeled-shoes also have a pointed, narrow toe box that crowds the toes and forces them into an unnatural triangular shape. These shoes distribute the body's weight unevenly, placing excess stress on the ball of the foot and on the forefoot. This uneven distribution of weight, coupled with the narrow toe box characteristic of most high heels, can lead to discomfort, bunions, hammertoes, and other deformities.

The height of the heel makes a dramatic difference in the pressure that occurs on the bottom of the foot. As heel height increases, the pressure under the ball of the foot may double, placing greater pressure on the forefoot as it is forced into the pointed toe box.

To relieve the abusive effects of high heels, women should limit the amount of time they wear them and alternate these shoes with good quality sneakers or flats for part of the day. Look for comfortable and attractive walking pumps for work and social activities, that blend fashion appeal with athletic shoe-derived construction, reinforced heels, and wider toe room for greater comfort. Low-heeled shoes (one inch or lower) with a wide toe box are the ideal choice for women. An ample toe box that can accommodate the front part of the foot is as important as the heel in determining fit.


 

Review interesting recent articles on feet.

 

From Journal Watch, June 6, 2013

The Agony of the Feet

By Amy Orciari Herman

Several new studies, including one in theJournal of Applied Physiology, have found that running barefoot or in minimalist footwear does not result in greater physiologic efficiency or injury prevention, according to the New York Times "Well" blog.

Indeed, it seems that when it comes to running, one style does not fit all. The Times quotes one expert: "I always recommend that runners run the way that is most natural and comfortable for them.... Each runner runs a certain way for a reason, likely because of the way they were physically built. Unless there is some indication that you should change things, such as repeated injury, do not mess with that plan."

New York Times "Well" blog

Journal of Applied Physiologyabstract

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-22555774